Tag Archives: External Wall Insulation Systems

Can I Install External Wall Insulation on a Cavity Wall?

At EWI Store, we receive many enquiries from homeowners who are very interested in installing EWI. However, there is often confusion as to whether it is possible to install EWI on a home with existing cavity wall insulation. In today’s post, we’re going to be tackling this question to see if we can clear things up!

What is Cavity Wall Insulation?

If your home was built after the 1920s, it’s likely that it will have been built with a cavity between the two exterior walls.

The main purpose of this cavity was to prevent damp crossing over from the outside through to the interior walls, but it wasn’t until later that people realised it could be used for another purpose. Nowadays, cavity walls are often retrofitted with an insulation material in order to increase energy efficiency and reduce the amount of heat lost through the walls.

In today’s housing stock, cavity wall insulation (CWI) seems to be the default method of wall insulation however, this isn’t to say that there haven’t been people with negative experiences of it. Damp and condensation have often been reported as a side effect of CWI, usually occurring as a result of cold bridges caused by poor installation. There are therefore many people who are quite rightly wary of CWI, so they instead look elsewhere for their wall insulation solutions.

What is External Wall Insulation?

If your home was built before the 1920s, then it’s likely to be a solid wall property. These properties present a bit of a challenge in terms of increasing energy efficiency because there is no cavity to fill, so homeowners either have to opt for no insulation (and high energy bills), internal wall insulation (IWI) or external wall insulation (EWI).

EWI provides the best solution for this type of building, as it is fitted onto the outside walls by securing the insulation boards with adhesive and fixings. A protective render is then applied to the insulation boards to create a weatherproof seal.

Unlike IWI where the thickness of the insulation is severely limited by how much floor space you can give up, EWI allows users to install insulation as thick as 200mm onto the outside walls of their properties.

Further to this, the effectiveness of CWI is dictated by the amount of insulation that can actually fit within the cavity – some cavities are just 50mm wide, so the benefits of insulating this are pretty slim.

EWI, therefore, offers increased potential for homes to massively up their efficiency. Unfortunately, it’s commonly assumed that homes with cavity wall insulation are: a) insulated well enough, and b) cannot have EWI as well as CWI.

To see what materials you will need and how much EWI may cost, visit our Materials Calculator Tool.

Can I have both EWI and CWI?

In fact, if you have CWI, then EWI is likely to reduce any problems with damp caused by the cavity wall insulation. This is because EWI completely envelopes your home in a weather-proof blanket, preventing water from entering through the exterior walls and keeping the temperature of the walls nice and warm. Because EWI wraps around the entirety of the exterior walls, there are no gaps and therefore thermal bridging is kept to a minimum.

So, because the internal temperature of the walls increases, the chances of damp and interstitial condensation are reduced. If there were any cold spots within the cavity wall insulation before, then the EWI will counteract the effect of these by maintaining a warm wall temperature.

If you currently live in a cavity insulated house and you want to upgrade the wall insulation even further, get in touch! We can talk you through the process and offer you our technical expertise.

 

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    Why you should have External Wall Insulation on your Cavity Walls

    Whether your house should occupy cavity wall insulation (CWI) or external wall insulation (EWI) is an age-old question that still leaves homeowners confused. While it seems obvious that CWI should be installed on cavity walls and EWI on solid walls, there are many benefits to having EWI installed on your cavity walls. Of course, the decision ultimately comes down to what best suits both your budget and your property; however, with CWI’s history of creating issues surrounding damp and mould compared to EWI’s aesthetically pleasing and energy-saving properties, it’s clear why EWI is quickly becoming the favoured choice.

    If you’re still torn on which type of insulation would be best for your home, we’ve compiled a little guide on the advantages and disadvantages of both CWI and EWI to aid your decision.

    Advantages of Cavity Wall Insulation

    If CWI is the only option for you, it does offer some benefits:

    • CWI does not alter the external appearance of your property
    • CWI helps to reduce your energy bills
    • CWI keeps your house warmer in the winter
    • CWI helps to reduce your carbon footprint
    • CWI is very quick and easy to install
    • CWI is cheaper than EWI

    Disadvantages of Cavity Wall Insulation

    If you are considering CWI, it is important to consider these factors:

    • CWI is at risk of being improperly installed by underqualified installers
    • CWI has been known to trap moisture and cause dampness when poorly installed
    • CWI restricts the amount of insulation that can be installed (dependent upon the size of the cavity), making it less effective than EWI
    • CWI is not suitable for all buildings (i.e. solid wall structures)

    Advantages of External Wall Insulation

    In contrast, EWI offers many benefits:

    • EWI massively improve the façade of a property due to the decorative topcoat
    • EWI has no restriction as to how much insulation can be installed (you can get up to 200mm+)
    • EWI regulates the thermal comfort of your home, thereby reducing energy costs
    • EWI materials such as Rockwool have soundproofing capabilities as an added advantage
    • EWI has minimal risk of dampness and condensation issues
    • EWI does not cause thermal bridging
    • EWI prolongs the lifespan of the building by protecting its exterior walls
    • EWI increases the value of the property in terms of its energy efficiency and external appearance
    • EWI requires very little maintenance
    • EWI is suitable for virtually any property type

    Disadvantages of External Wall Insulation

    Though not strictly disadvantages, there are some things to consider before installing EWI:

    • EWI is more expensive than CWI due to the number of materials required and the higher level of skill required to install it, but its long-term benefits make it worthwhile
    • EWI requires skill to install to ensure it is safe and won’t cause problems further down the line, so you need to be careful as to who you hire
    • EWI can be difficult to get planning permission for on older properties as it creates a completely new exterior
    • EWI may need the occasional touch up to ensure the render topcoat remains fresh, but this can be easily completed by giving it a little wash and by using our Silicone Paint

    The verdict: Why you should choose External Wall Insulation

    If you already have CWI installed and it’s not as effective as you would like it to be, you can certainly have EWI installed as well. By doing this, not only will you achieve two layers of insulation but any thermal bridges within the existing CWI will be negated by the EWI. Together, CWI and EWI will achieve maximum aesthetic and thermal performance.

    Nonetheless, the downside is that you can’t have one without the other; trying to install EWI onto an empty cavity wall will achieve very little given that the air within the cavity will be heated up before escaping. Therefore, if you don’t have CWI insulation already, be sure to have that installed first, then consider EWI at a later date.

    To conclude, EWI offers an array of benefits to an insulated cavity wall property; it greatly increases the thermal comfort, massively enhances the façade and even prolongs the lifespan of the building, to name a few. If you’re looking for more advice on having EWI installed onto your home, do not hesitate to reach out to our technical team who are available to help every step of the way!

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      How to fix cracked render

      While sand and cement render is still commonplace on many properties throughout the UK, it has one major issue: it is prone to cracking. Traditionally six parts sand and one part lime, sand and cement render is typically applied at a thickness of around 20mm and coated with masonry paint to complete the aesthetic. While lime can enhance flexibility, this render is still not flexible enough to withstand natural movements of a building (namely, expanding in the summer and shrinking in the winter), therefore causing ‘hairline’ cracks. Such cracks can not only impact the overall aesthetic of a property but also lead to water ingress, causing further issues down the line, including dampness, heat loss and mould. If you’ve noticed cracks of any kind on the façade of your property, you’ve come to the right place as we’re going to explain how to fix cracked render.

      If you’ve read our blog comparing sand and cement and thin-coat render systems, you’ll know that thin-coat renders are extremely flexible and therefore far less likely to crack than sand and cement render. As mentioned, sand and cement render is typically applied at a thickness of around 20mm; in contrast, thin-coat renders are exactly that: thin-coat, meaning that they range from 1mm to 3mm in thickness depending on the grain size chosen. What’s more, our thin-coat render systems are comprised of a flexible basecoat, embedded with fibreglass mesh for extra strength and crack resistance, then finished with a thin-coat render for a smooth, aesthetically pleasing finish. Going forward, we highly recommend choosing a thin-coat render system as their flexibility, durability and crack resistance is second to none.

      Depending on the size, severity and stage of development of the crack(s) on your property, there are several options for fixing cracked render.

      cracked render

      1. Fixing completely damaged render

      If the render is damaged all over (namely, full of cracks or peeling away), you have two options:

      • Start again

      The best solution for fixing cracked render is to start again! While this might not be what you wanted to hear, putting any other materials on top of cracked render is akin to using glue: it is only a temporary fix and, over time, the cracks will only continue to expand and worsen. Therefore, we always recommend stripping the existing render back to the brickwork, but we appreciate this may not be an option due to the time and cost implications.

      • Add a thin layer of EPS insulation

      The next best solution is to add a thin layer of EPS insulation (20mm or 30mm) to the wall; this first needs to be attached with adhesive, then anchored using mechanical fixings. Before adding the insulation board, try to remove any very loose render and make good the surface with a Levelling Mortar. Then, once the insulation boards are in place and the adhesive has set, you carry on the rest of the system as normal. On top of the insulation boards, apply a 6mm-thick basecoat layer with embedded reinforcing fibreglass mesh followed by a thin-coat render topcoat to provide a decorative finish. For more information on how much this render system typically costs, be sure to check out this blog on the cost of coloured render per square metre.

      Essentially, applying a thin layer of EPS means that you are creating a new, stable substrate onto which you can apply the thin-coat render system. Also, it means that you will boost the thermal performance of your home, albeit this is relative to the thickness of the layer of insulation.

      2. Fixing cracked render on just one panel

      If only one panel – that is, one side of the house – is cracked, we recommend first filling the crack with our Levelling Mortar, then applying fresh layers of a basecoat and a topcoat render to that one panel. Hopefully, the panel in which the crack has occurred doesn’t comprise the whole side of the house caused naturally by, for instance, a downpipe, which can disguise where the new render meets the old render. The breathability of the basecoat, combined with the flexibility of the render topcoat, should provide a crack-free solution.

      3. Fixing small cracks

      There are some cases where a very small crack has occurred that needs fixing; for example, when a car has ‘gently’ hit the wall. In this situation, you have a couple of options.

      Firstly, you can remove a square of render around the affected area and apply a basecoat and render topcoat to this area. This involves taking an angle grinder and cutting a clean square around the impacted area. The downside to this option, however, is that scarring where the new render meets the old render is inevitable as a consequence of the thinness of the new render. The square, marked out using rendering tape, ensures that the scar looks neat regardless.

      The other solution for fixing a small crack is to apply a basecoat to the whole panel and re-render the property; again, this requires a bit more work, but you won’t be able to see where the original crack in the render was. This provides a nicer finish than marking out the square (as above).

      We often see customers order additional buckets of render to make repairs on cracked or damaged render to simply ‘touch up’ the affected area but, 99% of the time, this will result in unsightly, visible scarring. That’s why we always recommend following one of the methods described in this blog depending on your circumstances.

      Which thin-coat render should I go for?

      Here at EWI Store, we offer four thin-coat coloured renders to choose from:

      • Silicone Render: Silicone Render is a premium, modern coloured render that is available in hundreds of colours. Silicone Render is a very popular choice because it offers hydrophobic properties, meaning that it repels water, dirt and organic growth, thereby requiring very little maintenance. Silicone Render is also extremely easy to apply because it comes ready to use, so you can apply it straight from the pot. Read more about Silicone Render here.
      • Silicone Silicate Render: Silicone Silicate Render is our most popular hybrid-silicone render. Silicone Silicate Render is our best-value render, offering the key benefits of a thin-coat render as well as the breathability, vapour-permeability and self-cleaning properties of silicone. If performance and functionality at a great price point are priorities, Silicone Silicate is a great choice.
      • Acrylic Render: Acrylic Render is very similar to silicone, except it doesn’t provide the same breathability. It’s a solid middle-ground thin-coat render because it still provides the same flexibility and is great at holding onto colour pigment. So, this is also a fantastic choice if you are looking to fix a cracked render. Read more about Acrylic Render here.
      • Mineral Render: Mineral Render is a dry-mix thin-coat render. This is a very popular choice if you live in a cold or rainy climate because mineral render is extremely fast-drying. The only downfall about this render is that you need to paint over it with silicone paint to seal it in because, if it’s left exposed to the elements, it can develop lime bloom due to its inclusion of Portland cement. Read more about Mineral Render here.

      At EWI Store, we are very happy to provide help with cracked render. The best way to resolve this is to send photos to [email protected] so that we can provide bespoke, expert advice on how to best fix the cracked render!

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        Can you paint over K Rend?

        Is your house currently rendered in K Rend? Has it been a while since your house was rendered? Is it looking a bit dull and dirty? If this sounds all too familiar, then it might be time to consider refreshing the façade of your property. Simply painting over the render might sound like the most obvious way to achieve this, but there’s slightly more to it than that. This blog unpacks how to go about painting over a property rendered in K Rend but not before explaining what K Rend is to help you identify the type of render on your property in case you’re not sure.

        What is K Rend?

        Due to its renown, K Rend is often confused as the umbrella term for all types of render when, in fact, it is a brand of render. Here at EWI Store, we stock K Rend Silicone K1 Monocouche Render and K Rend Silicone TC15 Topcoat. K Rend Silicone Render is water-repellent, polymer-modified and self-coloured, meaning it is available in a variety of colours so you can achieve your desired coloured finish.

        How long does K Rend last?

        While K Rend looks fantastic upon application, it can eventually look a bit grubby due to prolonged exposure to the elements. If you can see black, red or green streaks anywhere on the façade, this is a sign of biological growth and an even bigger sign that it simply needs a good clean; a simple jet wash should do the trick. It is vital to get rid of any biological growth before painting over the render as it can continue to grow under the paint, defeating the purpose of refreshing the face of the property. Nonetheless, too high pressurised water can cause damage to the surface of the property, so it is worth considering hiring a professional to clean it for you.

        How can I paint over K Rend?

        Once your property is clear of dirt and biological growth, it can be painted. However, while it is possible to paint over K Rend with standard masonry paint, it is advised to consult with a professional who can recommend more compatible paints as masonry paint can compromise the render system. For instance, our Silicone Paint works with our Silicone Render to offer advanced breathability, flexibility and durability, which can also be tinted to match the very same colour as the current façade or to absolutely any colour you like, including any RAL and NCS colour. If you need assistance, you can contact our experienced technical team here!

        The verdict…

        So, to answer the question at the beginning, you can paint over K Rend. However, some factors need to be considered before doing so, such as the condition of the render before painting (does it need a good clean?) and the type of paint to use over K Rend (which should be discussed with a professional). Once these factors have been considered, your property can be given a lovely refresh! Don’t forget that you can contact our knowledgeable team regarding any other questions you have, or fill in the form below to send your request.

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          Can You Paint Over Silicone Render?

          Have you had your Silicone Render for quite some time now? If so, you might be wondering how best to give it a little refresh. Here at EWI Store, we’re often asked how Silicone Render can be maintained to continue to exude a stand-out finish. Although Silicone Render has advanced self-cleaning properties, that doesn’t mean that it’s not completely susceptible to gathering dirt over time. To solve such, a gentle clean with a jet wash is perfect now and then however, houses that are likely to become dirty more easily – that is, those on busy roads or in highly-vegetated areas – may need to be painted over. That said, you might be wondering whether you can use standard masonry paint on top of Silicone Render. The simple answer is, while no one can stop you from doing so, it is highly recommended to use Silicone Paint instead. Keep reading to find out why.

          Why use Silicone Paint on top of Silicone Render?

          Silicone Render is a specialist, breathable render product ideal for application on external wall insulation systems where a breathable insulant, such as Mineral Wool, is being used. Therefore, while you technically can use standard masonry paint on top of Silicone Render, we recommend that you use Silicone Paint because it is also highly breathable. A standard masonry paint might not have such breathable properties which would completely nullify the render system’s ability to allow water vapour to pass through its surface, while a breathable Silicone Paint would work with the Silicone Render to continue to offer optimum performance.

          The best thing about our Silicone Paint is that it is available in thousands of colours. If your current render system is coloured and you’re afraid that you won’t find a colour to match, never fear – our Silicone Paints can be tinted to absolutely any shade! That way, not only will the Silicone Paint still cater to your taste, but it will also freshen up the entire façade of the property and extend its lifespan.

          How to apply Silicone Paint onto Silicone Render

          Before you apply Silicone Paint to your render, there are a few preparatory steps that must be taken to ensure a flawless finish. First, you’ll need to clear the render of any dirt or grime. If the walls have been painted previously, you’ll need to remove any flaking paint using either a jet washer or a wire brush. Also, be sure to apply tape to areas that need protection from the paint, such as window and door frames.

          Silicone Render is incredibly flexible and therefore highly unlikely to crack. However, if you notice any minor cracks, these too need to be filled.

          We recommend applying the paint using a standard brush and roller, starting at the top and working your way downwards to catch the paint as it drips and runs. Silicone Paint can be applied in multiple coats, so once the first is dry (after about 12 hours), you can go over it with as many coats as desired. However, beware that – if your render has a finer grain size – the more coats of Silicone Paint you apply, the less visible the grain size will become.

          So, if you’re looking to paint over your Silicone Render, look no further than Silicone Paint. Silicone Paint is the perfect solution for allowing your render system to continue to offer optimum performance, refresh the façade of your property and extend the façade’s lifespan. If you’re looking for a complete guide on how to maintain your render finish, be sure to check out our blog on how to look after your render finish here. As usual, if you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact us or comment below!

           

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            Coloured Render Cost Per Square Metre

            Here at EWI Store, we offer a vast range of coloured renders to both improve the look of your home and cater to every taste. Our renders can be tinted or matched to absolutely any colour, including any NCS, RAL and Pantone colour, allowing for maximum colour customisation. What’s more, with their advanced breathable, flexible and self-cleaning properties, rest assured our renders will offer your property the utmost protection.

            Choosing a coloured render for your property can be overwhelming. That’s why we offer colour charts and render tester pots to assist you in deciding which colour is best for you before making a purchase. However, once you’ve made the all-important decision as to which colour you’d like, you’re probably wondering: how much will it cost? Well, wonder no more, as we’re here to help!

            Calculating the cost of coloured render per square metre

            To work out exactly how much coloured render you will need for your property, we first need to work out the approximate square meterage of the property.

            Working out the square meterage of your external walls is easy: you just need to go outside and measure the length and height of the wall, then multiply the two numbers together. This needs to be repeated for each wall you intend to render, then totalled all together; this total will give you the external wall area.

            Priming the substrate

            Assuming the substrate is standard masonry, we recommend that you use our Water Based Primer, which costs around 30p per square metre.

            Applying the Basecoat and Mesh

            Then, we need to take into account the basecoat layer, which goes on before the coloured render to smooth out the external wall and aid adhesion. Fibreglass Mesh is also embedded in the basecoat. One bag of our EPS Basecoat will cover 4 to 5m2, which will cost £2.40 per m2. The Fibreglass Mesh, which will be embedded within the basecoat, will cost approximately 70p per square metre.

            Using a Render Primer

            Now, we need to consider how much render primer your property will require. For a Silicone Silicate system, you’ll need our EWI-333 SiSi Render Primer, which can also be tinted to match the colour of the render for extra opacity and pigmentation.

            A large 21kg bucket of Render Primer will cover approximately 60m2. This means that the primer will come to roughly 80p per square metre.

            • Top Coat Primer – 20kg

              £67.00 (incl VAT)

            Choosing a render

            Let’s assume you want to go for a Silicone Silicate Render. First, we need to calculate how much Silicone Silicate Render costs per square metre.

            For instance, one bucket of Silicone Silicate Render – with a grain size of 1.5mm – will cover between 9 and 10m2, which is roughly £4.90 per square metre.

            When buying your render, remember that coverage will vary based on the grain size that you go for; the larger the grain size, the more product you will need because it will provide less area coverage.

            Silicone coloured render

            Beading per m2

            Finally, we find that beading usually costs approximately £2 per square metre, although this can vary depending on the property.

            The total cost of Silicone Silicate coloured render system per square metre

            Altogether, the cost of a Silicone Silicate Render system per square metre approximately come to £10.80. Bear in mind that this is an approximation. Nonetheless, if you were to multiply this number with the square meterage of your property, you should get an idea as to how much the materials will cost for installing coloured render on your home!

            Which coloured render do I choose?

            We have a huge range of coloured renders to choose from, all of which are BBA-approved and of the highest quality on the market.

            We also provide tester pots that allow you to test different colours. It’s always best to see the coloured render in-person to ensure that you are happy with your decision before it’s applied all over your property.

            Our thin-coat-coloured renders are bestsellers. We offer:

            • Silicone Render/Silicone Silicate Render: Silicone Render is a premium, modern-technology coloured render which is available in hundreds of different colours. It is a customer favourite as it offers hydrophobic properties, meaning that it repels water, dirt and organic growth. Silicone Render is also ready-to-use, making it super easy to apply; it can be applied straight out of the box! Read more about Silicone Render here.
            • Acrylic Render: Acrylic Render is very similar to Silicone Render, except it doesn’t provide the same hydrophobic properties. Saying that, it still provides the same flexibility as other thin-coat renders and is great at holding onto the colour pigment; it’s a solid middle-ground thin-coat render. Read more about Acrylic Render here.
            • Mineral Render: Mineral Render is a dry-mix, thin coat render. This is a very popular choice if you live in a cold or rainy climate because mineral render is extremely fast-drying (you can’t apply other renders in cold or wet conditions as they take longer to dry). However, this render needs to be painted afterwards with silicone paint to seal it in because, if it’s left exposed to the elements, it can develop lime bloom due to its inclusion of Portland cement. Read more about Mineral Render here.
            • Monocouche Scratch Render: Monocouche Scratch Render is a thick-coat, through-coloured render. It is more traditional but does require extra work to install; it needs to be applied in two passes to provide extra strength and cannot be applied in wet or humid conditions. Monocouche Render also needs Fibreglass Mesh embedded within it to provide extra strength and flexibility, ultimately making it crack-resistant. Then, once it’s dried, it needs to be scratched back to achieve the desired texture. If our monocouche system is of interest to you, check out our blog Monocouche Scratch Render Cost Per Square Metre for a detailed insight into how much you’re looking at with this system.

            How much does Coloured Render cost to maintain?

            Let’s say, 10 years down the line, you want to give your render a bit of a refresh; Silicone Paint is a great way to do this as it can be matched to the exact colour of your existing render. To learn more about why Silicone Paint is best for refreshing an existing polymer-modified render, you can read this blog. However, in terms of sprucing up your render, a 15l bucket of Silicone Paint typically covers 60 to 70m2. Therefore, you’re looking at around £3 per m2.

            So, what do you think? Does Coloured Render sound right for you? Was this blog helpful? Be sure to comment with your thoughts and questions, should you have any, below – again, we’re here to help!

             

             

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              The Best Masonry Paint? Silicone Paint

              Are you interested in re-rendering your property and seeking high-quality masonry paint to coat the render for a fresh, modern finish? Then look no further than Silicone Paint! At EWI Store, we often receive enquiries about our Silicone Paint, the most common being “what is Silicone Paint?”, “what is Silicone Paint used for?” and “what’s the difference between Silicone Paint and Silicone Render?”. If you’re wondering the same, don’t worry – we’re going to cover everything you need to know about Silicone Paint right here, right now!

              What is Silicone Paint?

              Silicone Paint is a high-performance masonry paint that can be used for painting over either an existing Silicone Render to refresh the facade, or over our Mineral Render to seal the render. It is highly breathable, waterproof and resistant to environmental pollutants, making it perfect for homes in busy or humid environments where render alone may be susceptible to organic overgrowth. Silicone Paint is also available in thousands of colours, catering to every taste!

              What is the difference between Silicone Paint and Silicone Render?

              The names are self-explanatory; Silicone Paint is a masonry paint topcoat, while Silicone Render is a type of render finish. Their only similarity is that they both contain Silicone which provides numerous benefits, but we’ll come to those a bit later!

              While our thin-coat renders come in various grain sizes, ranging from 1mm to 3mm, our Silicone Paint is completely smooth, meaning it can be applied on top of an existing render without disrupting its texture.

              As with our Silicone Paint, our Silicone Render is hydrophobic, meaning it repels water, dirt and organic growth. However, even with all these capabilities, render can eventually look tired after so many years. That’s where Silicone Paint comes in; not only does it offer the render a decorative refresh, but also an extra layer of protection with its same hydrophobic properties, prolonging the render’s lifespan.

               

              Why use Silicone Paint?

              As we know, the ingress of water is detrimental to external wall insulation and render-only systems. In external wall insulation, the presence of water can reduce the system’s thermal capabilities and lead to freeze-thaw damage. In a render-only system, it can dampen the internal walls, especially in solid wall properties, damaging the overall render. Therefore, as part of external wall insulation or render-only systems, Silicone Paint is particularly beneficial; its breathability allows water to escape through the surface of the paint. Also, its vapour permeability makes it frostproof, meaning it won’t damage the surface of the paint.

              At EWI Store, we always suggest to our customers that our Mineral Render should be sealed with high-performance masonry paint like Silicone Paint. Mineral Render is our fastest-drying render, making it perfect for cold climates. However, its ingredients mean that, if exposed to the elements for too long, it can be susceptible to lime bloom. That’s why Silicone Paint is necessary as a topcoat; it prevents water from travelling through to the render and forming lime bloom.

              Silicone Paint can be matched to the Silicone Render underneath!

              If you’ve used one of our coloured Silicone Renders, then you can buy a Silicone Paint in the same colour to match! Here at EWI Store, we offer a same-day colour mixing service using our Render Colour Machine, which can tint Silicone Paint to thousands of colours. So, even if your render is not from EWI Pro, we can still match the colour to give it a refresh!

               

              As well as exteriors, Silicone Paint is great for interiors!

              Up to now, we’ve talked a lot about Silicone Paint can be used as a masonry paint as a render top coat to offer both a protective and decorative finish. However, as for exteriors, Silicone Paint is also great for interiors!

              Given that it’s waterproof, we’ve encountered many people who have used Silicone Paint in their bathrooms, making it perfect for combatting condensation on bathroom walls. Likewise, we’ve heard that people who have previously suffered from damp problems in their homes have used Silicone Paint as a deterrent, limiting the chances of such issues in future. One of our team members has even used Silicone Paint on his garden wall to prevent organic growth! In our opinion, all the above are great ways to utilise Silicone Paint.

              Get in touch to buy Silicone Paint!

              We’re always happy to answer any questions about our products. If you’re interested in using Silicone Paint for your home, don’t hesitate to give us a call so we can discuss its suitability for your situation; we can work out exactly how much you’ll need depending on the square meterage of your property.

               

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