Tag Archives: thin coat render

What are my House Render Colour Options?

Redecorating your house with coloured render can work wonders for giving your property a facelift and a refresh. With so many brands out there offering such a vast array of house render colour options, how can you ever really be sure what you are signing yourself up for? While the actual render colour may be nice – is the render itself suitable for your property?

Here at EWI Store, we have a range of renders which are all suitable for different properties and customer requirements. We pride ourselves on being able to offer render solutions for a large array of buildings. Better yet, our house render colour options are unbeatable, because we have render mixing facilities on site – so if you don’t fancy the standard colours on our colour chart we can mix up something special for you!

What type of House Renders can you Get?

Here at EWI Store, we offer a wide range of thin coat coloured house renders, all of which can be tinted using our highly calibrated colour mixing machine. Our thin coat renders can provide your house with numerous benefits…

Acrylic render: Acrylic is what most people think of when they think of thin coat coloured render. It is most renowned for coloured render because it is so great at holding onto colour pigment (think of the vibrancy of acrylic paint). Acrylic render is very impact resistant, so if you have kids who love kicking footballs against your walls acrylic render is right for you!

Silicone render: Currently, our top of the range thin coat house render is our Silicone render. Silicone render offers unsurpassed breathability and vapour permeability (it will allow water vapour to escape through it, thereby preventing damp). The inverse of this is that it’s also hydrophobic, so there’s no chance of water getting in. Silicone render is also self-cleaning, so it’s definitely the house render to choose if your house is situated in an area where there are lots of trees and plant life.

Silicone Silicate render: Silicone Silicate is very similar to silicone in that it offers excellent breathability and vapour permeability. The only real difference between the two is that Silicone Silicate will only offer a limited amount of resistance to organic growth. It’s therefore better suited to properties that do not require a high level of self cleaning capabilities.

Mineral render: Mineral render is a great choice if you live in a particularly harsh climate. Because of the fact that it’s fast drying, it can be installed in cold or humid conditions, nevertheless it does require painting with a silicone paint after it has dried to prevent the formation of lime bloom – which is essentially like a cement ‘disease’ which makes your house render appear patchy.

How does Grain Size affect House Render Colours?

When choosing their house render colours, many people don’t realise that their choice in grain size can affect the way that the house render colour may appear. This is because grains within the render can create a shadowing effect. The larger the grain size, the darker the house render colour may appear.

Monocouche House Render Colour Options

Because monocouche is a thick coat render, the monocouche house render colour range is slightly different to our thin coat renders. You can check out our monocouche colour options by ordering one of our thick coat render colour charts. Our monocouche colour charts clearly display our shade range by offering a sample of the actual render which has been set within the colour chart booklet.

What are the Benefits of Coloured House Render?

Decorating the exterior of your home can have numerous benefits for your property. Going for a neutral or even bright house render colour can give your property the facelift that it needs and make it stand out to potential buyers.

We’ve seen hundreds of properties go through transformations, from shabby pebbledash and peeling old render to fantastically fresh and brand new looking exteriors. It’s worth investing in and will ensure that you come home every day to a house you feel proud of!

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Coloured Render vs. Insulated Render – Ultimate Guide

In this industry, the terms ‘coloured render’ and ‘insulated render’ are bounded about a lot. The terms are often used interchangeably, however subtle differences do exist and in this blog we are going to take a look at these in a bit more detail.

What is coloured render?

Coloured render refers to render that is coloured right through it’s final decorative coat in one uniform appearance. Sand and cement render is not coloured render. When we refer to coloured render we usually refer to the EWI-010 Acrylic Render and the EWI-075 Silicone Render (also known as thin-coat renders), which form the final finish as part of a multi-layer build-up; or we refer to EWI-090 Monocouche Scratch Render, which is also coloured through and can be applied either on its own or on top of a basecoat preparation layer. Our coloured renders can now be matched to NCS colours as part of our colour matching service!

What are the differences in the coloured render types?

The acrylic or silicone renders usually come in wet bucket form and are manufactured in a standard white colour. To produce the coloured render, the acrylic or silicone renders go through a tinting machine, which consists of a pigment dispenser and a shaker. The coloured pigment is dispensed into a bucket in a controlled environment and this bucket is shaken-up by the shaker to produce one uniform colour throughout.

Monocouche scratch renders, come in a dry format, usually in 25kg bags – these are pre-mixed in different colours, and need to be mixed with clean potable water to make it ready for application.

Since monocouche render is pre-mixed with different colours, you will probably not be surprised to learn that the numbers of colours available with this type of render is limited. In fact, when going with a monocouche coloured render, you can pick from 18 different colours, but if you opt for the thin coat coloured renders you can literally pick from thousands of colours.

Another difference between monocouche and thin coat renders is the type of finish that is achieved. While the thin coat renders, usually leave a textured, sand type finish, the monocouche scratch renders achieve a pitted effect, by effectively leaving little scratches on the surface (hence often referred to as scratch coloured render). Both finishes look great, so choosing which coloured render to go for normally comes down to which look the end-user prefers.

The other differences between the two different coloured renders is how they are applied to the wall. The scratch render is in applied at a thickness of 18mm and scratched back using a scratch render scraper to give a final thickness of 16mm. Conversely the thin coat renders are applied at a thickness of 1-3mm onto a flexible basecoat layer (basecoat + embedded mesh). This means that a bucket of thin coat render will go far further in terms of coverage than a bag of monocouche scratch coloured render when applied to the wall.

Our dash receiver is also bagged like the monocouche scratch render and comes in different colours, but the decorative pebbles that stick on the outer surface form the main part of the decorative feature so the amount of actual dash receiver you can see is limited.

What is insulated render?

Very often when we refer to insulated render, we refer to a coloured through render backed on an external wall insulation material. This external wall insulation material can either be lightweight EPS, stone wool (mineral wool) or wood fibre insulation. The insulated render part is the final decorative layer that sits on top of the reinforcement layer, which in turn sits on top of the insulating material.  The whole system in therefore an example of an insulated render system or a external wall insulation system (EWI).

What are the differences in the insulated render types?

There are differences in insulated render types, which are characterised by the differences in the build-up – starting from the insulation material, to the reinforcement layer and then a variation in the decorative look.

For example, insulated renders can use one of the following insulating materials: EPS, Mineral Wool and Wood fibre insulation. Phenolic insulated can also be used in insulated render, but we don’t recommend this since it delaminates over time when in situ and also can react with metal fixings to create an acid that can leech on to the render.

Basecoats and reinforcement mesh may vary to achieve a different preparatory coat ready to receive the final coat. Basecoats can either be in the grey or white adhesive types. Also, the system build-up may contain a slight variation in the weight of the fibreglass mesh, with one coat mesh or two coat mesh being used for different impact resistance requirements.

Coloured renders like the thin coat silicone or acrylic can sit on top of an insulated render system and work very well. Monocouche scratch render can also sit on top of the reinforcement layer, but it is not commonly specified due to the weight/ load of this final coat of the coloured through render.

Can the render itself be insulated?

In certain and rare circumstances, the coloured render itself can contain special insulating properties, which when used as part of the render build-up can be considered an insulating render. These coloured renders don’t necessarily have an insulating material behind it. An example of a coloured render that is also an insulated render, is using a basecoat that contains a certain amount of the following ingredients (not limited to this list): perlite, EPS, cork or aerogel, and the product itself has a declared lambda value (ƛ) on the product packaging.

An example build-up of coloured render with insulating properties: the EWI-520 Insulating Basecoat with a layer of fibreglass mesh to give the layer flexibility; finished off with 1.5mm of the EWI-075 Silicone Render.

Although the insulated coloured render in this example has insulation properties, it would not replace the degree of insulation associated by installing a full external wall insulation system. You could install this type of system in areas of difficult access or where it would be tricky to thicken the walls by a certain degree due to width (boundary) restrictions around the property.

Coloured renders and insulated renders in summary

As discussed above coloured renders and insulated renders are used interchangeably in the industry but you do have subtle differences. Coloured render refers to the cement-based plaster applied either as a basecoat and a thin-coat decorative finish; or to a one-coat Monocouche Scratch Render applied in one pass onto the substrate.

Insulated Render usually applies to an external wall insulation system that not only contains a coloured render, but an insulation material that is adhered to the substrate. This insulation material can EPS, Mineral Wool or Wood fibre insulation.

Coloured render can also have insulating properties, but it must be declared on the packaging. However this can be used to take the edge of a substrate rather than as a prime insulating material for the purposes of thermal insulation.